Music grant applications

Anytime you want to use intervals based on perfect fifths, you’re multiplying and dividing by 3, but anytime you want to use intervals based on major thirds, you’re multiplying and dividing by 5. Starting from C, it’s possible to produce any note on the piano if you multiply or divide your frequencies by 3 enough times, but those notes won’t be in tune with the notes you’d get multiplying or dividing your frequencies by 5, because 3 and 5 don’t mutually divide evenly. This is not just an abstract mathematical issue. It’s the reason that it’s impossible to have a guitar be in tune with itself.

This vinyl-related project couldn’t be more different from the one above. Until recently, Jesu Berkeley was just a talented dad. Now, he’s an educator and community activist with a dream to provide a creative space for students and at-risk youth to learn about DJing, turntablism, and scratchology!

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80s hip hop artists

Alright, this one is another melody you’ve definitely heard before, whether you think you have or not. Francis Lai’s theme song to the film Love Story actually opens with two notes ascending a minor sixth, but if you skip ahead to 0:24, just after a short horn fanfare, those two notes reverse briefly before entering the meat of the run. Either way you play those two notes back, it’s a minor sixth interval, but train your ears to hear it as a descending melody to recognize the gap as such.

The very first time I can recall hearing this song on my parents’ turntable, I was struck by that groovy little bass riff between the lyric lines “tell you something” and “I think you’ll understand,” and repeated throughout the verses in the same spot. What makes this little flurry of notes so clever is the sudden change in meter (coming out of the slow, steady rocking on the root and sometimes the fifth) and the double emphasis on the leading tones.

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Fender music foundation

Valhalla is known for its digital reverbs and delays that pay homage to digital reverbs of the late 1970s and early ’80s, and otherworldly algorithmic reverbs that sounded huge and atmospheric. The Valhalla Frequency Echo is a combination of a vintage echo delay and a frequency shifter, giving you sonic results that “range from subtle chorusing and double tracking to barber pole phasing and flanging to endless glissandos and runaway echos.” Whether you’re putting mono or stereo signal in, it converts to a stereo signal out.

One thing you might have noticed is that we haven’t seen a ton of instrumental music so far. As previously stated, it’s not always as easy to identify a verse and chorus in instrumental music, so thinking in terms of Section A and B can be more useful. But given that, there’s really no limit on what sort of structures you might see:

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