80s hip hop artists

Alright, this one is another melody you’ve definitely heard before, whether you think you have or not. Francis Lai’s theme song to the film Love Story actually opens with two notes ascending a minor sixth, but if you skip ahead to 0:24, just after a short horn fanfare, those two notes reverse briefly before entering the meat of the run. Either way you play those two notes back, it’s a minor sixth interval, but train your ears to hear it as a descending melody to recognize the gap as such.

The very first time I can recall hearing this song on my parents’ turntable, I was struck by that groovy little bass riff between the lyric lines “tell you something” and “I think you’ll understand,” and repeated throughout the verses in the same spot. What makes this little flurry of notes so clever is the sudden change in meter (coming out of the slow, steady rocking on the root and sometimes the fifth) and the double emphasis on the leading tones.

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Call for curators

The violin was his passion, so much so that in 1797, he published a pamphlet on the changing style of violin-playing between the Baroque and Classical eras, called Metodo per Violino. He ended up composing a handful of notable works, but his “educational” pieces are definitely the most well-known and still studied today in conservatories. Campagnoli wrote 30 Preludes for violin in all 24 keys, 41 Caprices for solo viola, and other Divertissements.

Once you’ve laid down your piano track, you can quantize it so that your attacks line up perfectly with the grid. This is a good way to make sure everything is in time and won’t confuse your listener with any off beats. But don’t rely too heavily on the grid or you risk making your music sound stale. (*Luckily, by using randomization techniques, you can improve that too!)

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Old school hip hop artists 90’s

Bands who play on proper venue stages are removed and distanced from their audience. The band-to-fan connections artists constantly seek to forge in live performance are made much easier and more frequently in the setting of a living room or back porch. You’ll also have a better chance at making friends with members of the audience and other performing musicians, because after your set, there will literally be nowhere to hide — unless you awkwardly pack up your things and leave the house without making eye contact or saying a word to anyone. I don’t recommend doing that.

When it comes to music “now,” it all depends on who and what we’re talking about. The stuff that gets advertised on harshly illuminated screens down on L Train platforms? The bands involved in what that Pitchfork describes as “the most important stories in music?” Spotify Playlists for the gym? The Bang On a Can Allstars? Generally, I mistrust these things, because I don’t see them making any attempts to use music’s great power to snap people out of the general stupor of malaise that seems to be a symptom of living in our times.

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