Call for curators

The violin was his passion, so much so that in 1797, he published a pamphlet on the changing style of violin-playing between the Baroque and Classical eras, called Metodo per Violino. He ended up composing a handful of notable works, but his “educational” pieces are definitely the most well-known and still studied today in conservatories. Campagnoli wrote 30 Preludes for violin in all 24 keys, 41 Caprices for solo viola, and other Divertissements.

Once you’ve laid down your piano track, you can quantize it so that your attacks line up perfectly with the grid. This is a good way to make sure everything is in time and won’t confuse your listener with any off beats. But don’t rely too heavily on the grid or you risk making your music sound stale. (*Luckily, by using randomization techniques, you can improve that too!)

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Pabst blue ribbon coffee

The key to editing is storytelling. Does this story make sense? Would it flow better to have certain parts shifted around? Does the tangent the guest went off on ever come back around to the theme? You would edit a written piece that gets published, just as I am doing as I write this. The same needs to be done for an audio piece.

Lots of times we think the best practice should feel easy, when the opposite is actually true. I remember this point coming up a lot in the another useful rundown of effective practice techniques, the book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. The authors talk about “desirable difficulties” — basically, by practicing in such a way that feels difficult rather than easy you facilitate more long-term learning.

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